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Maui Now : FEMA Lane Preparations Underway on Maui

ACTIVE ALERTS:

Flash Flood Warning issued August 23 at 8:52AM HST expiring August 23 at 11:45AM HST by NWS Honolulu HI

The National Weather Service in Honolulu has issued a * Flash Flood Warning for… The island of Maui in Maui County * Until 1145 AM HST. * At 848 AM HST, heavy rain has moved over east Maui from Hana to Kipahulu. Emergency management reported Waikoloa Road near Hana was closed. Rainfall will continue to move over east Maui over the next several hours. * Locations in the warning include but are not limited to… Haiku-Pauwela, Huelo, Pauwela, Kipahulu, Nahiku, Kaupo, Hana, Makawao and Kula.

Flood Advisory issued August 23 at 7:46AM HST expiring August 23 at 11:00AM HST by NWS Honolulu HI

The National Weather Service in Honolulu has extended the * Flood advisory for… The island of Maui in Maui County * Until 1100 AM HST. * At 743 AM HST, radar showed rain rates have decreased but runoff continues over east Maui. An area of heavy rain is expected to move onshore from the east which will cause streams to rise again, especially from Keanae to Kipahulu. * Locations in the advisory include but are not limited to… Haliimaile, Pauwela, Kipahulu, Paia, Makawao, Keokea, Makena, Haiku-Pauwela, Wailea, Huelo, Ulupalakua and Kula.

High Surf Warning issued August 23 at 6:26AM HST expiring August 24 at 6:00PM HST by NWS Honolulu HI

Life-threatening surf will impact south facing shores of all Hawaiian Islands through Friday as Hurricane Lane approaches. * SURF…7 to 10 feet, rising to 10 to 15 feet by tonight, then 12 to 20 feet Friday. * TIMING…peaking tonight through Friday. * IMPACTS…Extreme…Ocean water sweeping over shorelines and large breaking waves affecting harbor entrances. Damage to coastal properties and infrastructure, including roadways, docks, piers, ramps, and boats.

Flash Flood Watch issued August 23 at 6:01AM HST expiring August 25 at 6:00AM HST by NWS Honolulu HI

Deep tropical moisture associated with Lane will continue to spread across the island chain from the southeast, with increased potential for heavy rainfall and flooding. The Flash Flood Watch continues for * Entire State of Hawaii. * Through late Friday night * Abundant moisture from Hurricane Lane is moving across the Big Island and Maui, and will continue to spread across the rest of the islands through Friday. Heavy rainfall is expected, especially along southeast and east facing slopes. Storm total rainfall amounts greater than 20 inches are possible. The flooding threat will increase as Hurricane Lane approaches. * In addition to flood prone areas, heavy rain events of this size may cause flooding in areas outside of designated flood zones. Low spots in roads will become dangerous and impassible due to severe runoff. High amounts of debris in streams and gulches may clog bridges and culverts resulting in dangerous flooding outside the normal channels and significant property damage.

Tropical Cyclone Statement issued August 23 at 5:59AM HST by NWS Honolulu HI

This product covers the Hawaiian islands **LANE APPROACHING THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS AS A MAJOR CATEGORY 4 HURRICANE** NEW INFORMATION ————— * CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS: – None * CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS: – A Hurricane Watch is in effect for Kauai Leeward, Kauai Mountains, Kauai Windward, and Niihau – A Hurricane Warning is in effect for Big Island Interior, Big Island North and East, Big Island Summits, Central Oahu, Haleakala Summit, Kahoolawe, Kohala, Kona, Lanai Makai, Lanai Mauka, Leeward Haleakala, Maui Central Valley, Maui Leeward West, Maui Windward West, Molokai Leeward, Molokai Windward, Oahu Koolau, Oahu North Shore, Oahu South Shore, Olomana, South Big Island, Waianae Coast, Waianae Mountains, and Windward Haleakala * STORM INFORMATION: – About 310 miles south of Honolulu or about 210 miles south-southwest of Kailua-Kona – 16.9N 157.4W – Storm Intensity 130 mph – Movement Northwest or 320 degrees at 7 mph SITUATION OVERVIEW —————— Hurricane Lane remains a major category 4 storm early this morning, with maximum sustained winds of 130 mph. As of 5 AM, Hurricane Lane was located around 210 miles south-southwest of Kailua-Kona, Hawaii and 305 miles south of Honolulu, Hawaii. Lane is moving northwest at around 7 mph. This general motion is expected to continue today with a turn toward the north-northwest, followed by a turn toward the north tonight through Friday with a decrease in forward speed. A turn back toward the west is then expected Saturday and Sunday. The latest forecast track from the Central Pacific Hurricane Center brings the center of Lane dangerously close to the Hawaiian Islands during the Thursday through Saturday time frame. Regardless of the exact track, life threatening impacts are likely over many areas as this strong hurricane makes its closest approach. All individuals in Hawaii are urged not to focus on the exact forecast track or intensity of Lane, and be prepared for adjustments in future forecast updates. Although the official forecast does not explicitly indicate Lane’s center making landfall over any of the islands, this could still occur. The onset of damaging tropical storm-force winds are expected to develop across portions of the Big Island later this morning, with dangerous hurricane force winds expected by tonight. In Maui County, damaging tropical storm-force winds are expected late today or tonight, with dangerous hurricane force winds expected in some areas by Friday. On Oahu, damaging tropical storm force winds are expected to develop late tonight, with dangerous hurricane force winds expected Friday into Friday night. A Hurricane or Tropical Storm Warning may needed for Kauai County as Lane draws closer. Outer rain bands associated with Hurricane Lane are already affecting the Big Island and Maui, with widespread heavy rainfall and flash flooding ongoing over windward portions of the Big Island. The rain bands will continue to spread from southeast to northwest across the other islands today through Friday. Excessive rainfall is likely which could result in life threatening flash flooding, as well as landslides and mudslides. Flooding from these heavy rains will also be possible in areas that are typically not prone to flooding. Storm total rainfall amounts of 10 to 20 inches are expected to be common across the island chain, with localized amounts in excess of 30 inches. Swells generated by Lane will produce very large life-threatening surf and dangerous rip currents along south, southeast and southwest facing shores of all of the Hawaiian islands. Large surf is already occurring along southeast facing shores of the Big Island. Surf is expected to increase today along southwest facing shores of the Big Island as well as along south and southeast facing shores from Maui County to Kauai County, with the surf becoming extremely large tonight through Saturday. Surf heights as large as 15 to 25 feet are expected along the Kau and Puna coasts of the Big Island, 10 to 15 feet along the Kona coast, and 12 to 20 feet along south and southeast facing coasts from Kauai County to Maui County. The combination of storm surge and large breaking waves is expected to raise water levels well above normal tide levels as Hurricane Lane makes its closest approach. Water levels could reach 2 to 4 feet above normal along south and west facing shores from Kauai to Maui, as well as southeast facing shores of the Big Island, with water levels as high as 3 to 5 feet above normal along west facing shores of the Big Island, provided that Lane makes landfall. This is expected to result in significant beach erosion and overwash onto vulnerable coastal roadways today through Saturday as Lane makes its closest approach, particularly for vulnerable low-lying coastal areas during and around the time of the normal high tide cycles. Tornadoes and large waterspouts will be possible with Lane, mainly along and to the right of the track of the hurricane. POTENTIAL IMPACTS —————– * FLOODING RAIN: Protect against life-threatening rainfall flooding having possible devastating impacts across the Hawaiian islands. Potential impacts include: – Extreme rainfall flooding may prompt numerous evacuations and rescues. – Rivers and tributaries may overwhelmingly overflow their banks in many places with deep moving water. Small streams, creeks, canals, arroyos, and ditches may become raging rivers. In mountain areas, deadly runoff may rage down valleys while increasing susceptibility to rockslides and mudslides. Flood control systems and barriers may become stressed. – Flood waters can enter numerous structures within multiple communities, some structures becoming uninhabitable or washed away. Numerous places where flood waters may cover escape routes. Streets and parking lots become rivers of raging water with underpasses submerged. Driving conditions become very dangerous. Numerous road and bridge closures with some weakened or washed out. * WIND: Protect against dangerous wind having possible significant impacts across Maui County, Oahu, and western and southern sections of the Big Island. Potential impacts in this area include: – Some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight objects become dangerous projectiles. – Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several fences and roadway signs blown over. – Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access routes impassable. – Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent in areas with above ground lines. Also, protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across the northern and eastern sections of the Big Island and Kauai. * SURGE: Protect against life-threatening surge having possible significant impacts across southeast, south and southwest facing coastlines. Potential impacts in this area include: – Areas of inundation with storm surge flooding accentuated by waves. Damage to several buildings, mainly near the coast. – Sections of near-shore escape routes and secondary roads become weakened or washed out, especially in usually vulnerable low spots. – Major beach erosion with heavy surf breaching dunes. Strong and numerous rip currents. – Moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers. Several small craft broken away from moorings, especially in unprotected anchorages. Elsewhere across the Hawaiian islands, little to no surge impact is expected at this time. * TORNADOES: Protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts across the Hawaiian islands. Potential impacts include: – The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. – A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. – Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow-rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings.

Hurricane Warning issued August 23 at 5:46AM HST by NWS Honolulu HI

* LOCATIONS AFFECTED – Kahului – Puunene – Maalaea * WIND – LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Below tropical storm force wind – Peak Wind Forecast: 25-35 mph with gusts to 60 mph – POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: Potential for wind 58 to 73 mph – The wind threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. – PLAN: Plan for dangerous wind of equivalent strong tropical storm force due to possible forecast changes in track, size, or intensity. – PREPARE: Remaining efforts to protect life and property should be completed as soon as possible. Prepare for significant wind damage. – ACT: Move to safe shelter before the wind becomes hazardous. – POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Significant – Some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight objects become dangerous projectiles. – Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several fences and roadway signs blown over. – Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access routes impassable. – Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent in areas with above ground lines. * STORM SURGE – LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Localized storm surge possible – Peak Storm Surge Inundation: The potential for up to 2 feet above ground somewhere within surge prone areas – Window of concern: Begins this morning – POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: Potential for storm surge flooding greater than 1 foot above ground – The storm surge threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. – PLAN: Plan for storm surge flooding greater than 1 foot above ground. – PREPARE: Complete preparations for storm surge flooding, especially in low-lying vulnerable areas, before conditions become unsafe. – ACT: Leave immediately if evacuation orders are given for your area. – POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited – Localized inundation with storm surge flooding mainly along immediate shorelines and in low-lying spots, or in areas farther inland near where higher surge waters move ashore. – Sections of near-shore roads and parking lots become overspread with surge water. Driving conditions dangerous in places where surge water covers the road. – Moderate beach erosion. Heavy surf also breaching dunes, mainly in usually vulnerable locations. Strong rip currents. – Minor to locally moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers. A few small craft broken away from moorings. * FLOODING RAIN – LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Flash Flood Watch is in effect – Peak Rainfall Amounts: Additional 6-10 inches, with locally higher amounts – POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: Potential for extreme flooding rain – The flooding rain threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. – PLAN: Emergency plans should include the potential for extreme flooding from heavy rain. Evacuations and rescues are likely. – PREPARE: Urgently consider protective actions from extreme and widespread rainfall flooding. – ACT: Heed any flood watches and warnings. Failure to take action will likely result in serious injury or loss of life. – POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Devastating to Catastrophic – Extreme rainfall flooding may prompt numerous evacuations and rescues. – Rivers and tributaries may overwhelmingly overflow their banks in many places with deep moving water. Small streams, creeks, canals, arroyos, and ditches may become raging rivers. In mountain areas, deadly runoff may rage down valleys while increasing susceptibility to rockslides and mudslides. Flood control systems and barriers may become stressed. – Flood waters can enter numerous structures within multiple communities, some structures becoming uninhabitable or washed away. Numerous places where flood waters may cover escape routes. Streets and parking lots become rivers of raging water with underpasses submerged. Driving conditions become very dangerous. Numerous road and bridge closures with some weakened or washed out. * TORNADO – LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: – Situation is somewhat favorable for tornadoes – POTENTIAL THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: Potential for a few tornadoes – The tornado threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. – PLAN: Emergency plans should include the potential for a few tornadoes. – PREPARE: If your shelter is particularly vulnerable to tornadoes, prepare to relocate to safe shelter before hazardous weather arrives. – ACT: If a tornado warning is issued, be ready to shelter quickly. – POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited – The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. – A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. – Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow-rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings. * FOR MORE INFORMATION: – http://www.prh.noaa.gov/hnl

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